Discussion Paper

Discussion Paper are short research papers which are directed at different research target groups. These papers deal in general with concrete and stringently collected topics. They often discuss interim findings on research projects, theses, evaluation and political reports. Discussion Paper can be downloaded for free on the website of the German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS) or ordered at a price of € 6.00. Please contact our publication department by mail or e-mail.

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  1. African jobs in the digital era: export options with a focus on online labour
    African jobs in the digital era: export options with a focus on online labour

    Melia, Elvis (2020)
    Discussion Paper, 3/2020

    Can services exports become the vehicle for African development in the 21st century, the way manufacturing exports were the vehicle for 20th-century East Asia? The growth of Kenya’s online work sector hints that this is possible.

  2. China’s growing engagement with the UNDS as an emerging nation: changing rationales, funding preferences and future trends
    China’s growing engagement with the UNDS as an emerging nation: changing rationales, funding preferences and future trends

    Ruipeng, Mao (2020)
    Discussion Paper, 2/2020

    China is upgrading its foreign policy by activily participating in global goverance. Its funding to the UN development system has risen rapidly since 2008 and even accelerated in 2013. This paper focuses on China’s engagement with the UNDS, specifically Chinese funding and allocation decisions.

  3. Exporting out of China or out of Africa? Automation versus relocation in the global clothing industry
    Exporting out of China or out of Africa? Automation versus relocation in the global clothing industry

    Altenburg, Tilman / Xiao Chen / Wilfried Lütkenhorst / Cornelia Staritz / Lindsay Whitfield (2020)
    Discussion Paper, 1/2020

    China’s position as the biggest garment exporter is threatened by rising wages. This study shows that some production is indeed relocated to lower cost countries, but only a small fraction goes to Africa. In parallel, automation technology evolves, but is too expensive to radically substitute labour.

  4. Global imbalances: a job for the G20?
    Global imbalances: a job for the G20?

    Fischer, Roger A. (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 18/2019

    Excessive current account imbalances accumulate because the global economy cannot effectively transform funds into consumption and productive investment. The G20 is well placed to foster international coordination to reduce global imbalances. To do so its current procedures need to be reformed.

  5. Not in my backyard? Welfare gains and social challenges: the impact of refugees on the host population in Uganda
    Not in my backyard? Welfare gains and social challenges: the impact of refugees on the host population in Uganda

    Kuhnt, Jana / Jana Lenze / Ramona Rischke (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 17/2019

    We exploit a natural experiment of three sudden Congolese refugee inflows to causally investigate the impact of an increased exposure to refugee presence on the Ugandan host population. We focus on the effects on female employment, household welfare and social cohesion among the host population.

  6. Social protection as a tool to address slow onset climate events: emerging issues for research and policy
    Social protection as a tool to address slow onset climate events: emerging issues for research and policy

    Aleksandrova, Mariya (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 16/2019

    What is the potential for social protection to tackle climate risks? This discussion paper derives recommendations for advanced research and policy agenda on social protection and climate change with a specific focus on lessening loss and damage from slow onset events and addressing residual risks.

  7. Freshwater as a global commons: international governance and the role of Germany
    Freshwater as a global commons: international governance and the role of Germany

    Herrfahrdt-Pähle, Elke / Waltina Scheumann / Annabelle Houdret / Ines Dombrowsky (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 15/2019

    This study conceives water as a global common and argues that addressing the current crisis needs a global governance approach to complement national and regional policies. A global water governance regime could be based on the improved interplay of the existing elements and include two innovations.

  8. Integrated policymaking: choosing an institutional design for implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
    Integrated policymaking: choosing an institutional design for implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

    Breuer, Anita / Julia Leininger / Jale Tosun (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 14/2019

    Integrated implementation of the 2030 Agenda will require institutional reform. To identify causes of reform blockades and enablers of innovation this study analyses how political and economic context factors influence countries’ institutional design choices when it comes to SDG-governance.

  9. Erkenntnisse aus der wirkungsorientierten Begleitforschung: Potential und Grenzen der rigorosen Wirkungsanalyse von Governance-Programmen
    Erkenntnisse aus der wirkungsorientierten Begleitforschung: Potential und Grenzen der rigorosen Wirkungsanalyse von Governance-Programmen

    Funk, Evelyn / Lisa Groß / Julia Leininger / Armin von Schiller (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 13/2019

    Wie kann die Wirkung von Governance-Programmen erfolgreich analysiert werden? In der vorliegenden Publikation dokumentieren die Autor/innen praxisorientierte und verallgemeinerbare Erkenntnisse über die Durchführung rigoroser Wirkungsanalysen in entwicklungspolitischen Governance-Programmen.

  10. Digitalisation in the lives of urban migrants: evidence from Bogota
    Digitalisation in the lives of urban migrants: evidence from Bogota

    Martin-Shields, Charles P. / Sonia Camacho / Rodrigo Taborda / Constantin Ruhe (2019)
    Discussion Paper, 12/2019

    This paper explores how access to digital technology (ICTs) differs between long-term residents and urban migrants in Bogota. Our data indicates that while migrants initially have lower access to ICTs, over time they become more likely than long-term residents to gain ICT and internet access.